Bloom's Day

Completely random thoughts about a wide array of subjects

In this week’s podcast, Deadline’s executive editor David Lieberman talks with me as we recap one heck of a week in the business of providing services that look more or less like television across all kinds of delivery platforms.

The NCTA cable-TV conference opened in Los Angeles, attracting numerous big-name speakers such as the FCC chairman, but big deals also seemed to be breaking out everywhere.

There was talk of a massive deal between AT&T and DirecTV Networks; a $20-billion swap of subscribers between Charter and Comcast, and Viacom’s $757 million acquisition of the UK’s Channel 5.

Along the way,DreamWorks Animation’s Jeffrey Katzenberg seemed to write off his core business, and got roundly whacked by another media mogul, Jeff Bewkes of Time Warner. In a word, “ouch.”

My new sounds:

In this week’s podcast, Deadline Executive Editor David Lieberman and I catch up on several big developments in the fast-changing business of video delivery. This week, we talked everything from the controversy over the FCC’s latest net-neutrality proposals to what the Supreme Court oral arguments on Aereo suggest about a coming decision and a potentially very big content deal between HBO and Amazon that Apple downplayed. 

We also checked in on the latest in Time Warner Cable’s stalled efforts to push its Los Angeles Dodgers channel, and Netflix’s possible price hike for newcomers after another big quarter.

In this week’s podcast, Deadline Awards Columnist Pete Hammond and host David Bloom look at highlights from that other big French film festival, City of Lights – City of Angels, which opened this week in Los Angeles.

They also discuss the potential business impact of sexual-abuse allegations against Woody Allen and Bryan Singer on “Fading Gigolo” and the new “X-Men” sequel and catch up on next year’s Oscar producers and this year’s possible Emmy host.

Pete also gives his take on the weekend’s notable movie debuts, which include the three-woman comedy “The Other Woman,” the one-man suspense film Locke with Tom Hardy and the WWII drama “Walking With The Enemy,” starring Ben Kingsley in another fine supporting role. 

Navigate News With The Upshot - NYTimes.com

The @NYTimes kicks off an explanatory news site that will use big data to look at big trends. Here’s hoping it’s a huge hit.

My latest podcast with Deadline International Editor Nancy Tartaglione. We talk about the just-announced lineups for the Cannes Film Festival and much else, as well as our regular weekly look at the international box office. 

Ahead of oral arguments before the Supreme Court on the legality of Aereo’s TV service, I sat down with Dominic Patten to talk about the legal issues on all sides of what could be a very big case.

It’s a brisk 8-minute audio conversation. Let us also recommend that you circle back to Deadline.com for more stories from Dominic and other Deadline writers on a case that could re-shape broadcasting, and possibly much of the business of cloud computing.

(Source: deadline.com / DBinLA)

In this week’s podcast, Deadline Executive Editor David Lieberman and host David Bloom preview what could be a very big day in the history of broadcasting and technology, as the Supreme Court hears legal arguments Monday about Aereo and its business model. The Davids talk about what’s at stake and how it might play out, where broadcasters might go if they lose and whether a win will turn the broadcasting business upside down. 
They also look over that very messy, and pricey Disney acquisition of online video powerhouse Maker Studios, and examine why ESPN, pay-TV’s most valuable brand, felt compelled to pitch investors that it’s just fine despite competition, cord-cutting and other existential challenges.
Listen to the whole thing here: http://www.deadline.com/2014/04/deadline-big-media-aereo-supreme-court-preview-podcast/

In this week’s podcast, Deadline Executive Editor David Lieberman and host David Bloom preview what could be a very big day in the history of broadcasting and technology, as the Supreme Court hears legal arguments Monday about Aereo and its business model. The Davids talk about what’s at stake and how it might play out, where broadcasters might go if they lose and whether a win will turn the broadcasting business upside down.

They also look over that very messy, and pricey Disney acquisition of online video powerhouse Maker Studios, and examine why ESPN, pay-TV’s most valuable brand, felt compelled to pitch investors that it’s just fine despite competition, cord-cutting and other existential challenges.

Listen to the whole thing here: http://www.deadline.com/2014/04/deadline-big-media-aereo-supreme-court-preview-podcast/

Why is equity valuable in the Valley? Because it’s assumed that the entire point of the business is to exit or IPO. From a certain point of view, a Klout only exists in order to make a big exit for a relatively small investment, and that exit fuels any number of further investments. However if you take the exit/IPO option away then equity becomes what exactly? Shares that’ll never multiply in value. They become deadweight unless you can get percentages of revenue or profit, which is impossible for many Valley businesses. The sale is necessary, vital even, to keep the wheels turning.

But most games people don’t want to sell. Like ever, if possible. Maybe they’ll sell to retire, get bored or if business conditions change such that their studio is no longer viable. But mostly not. Instead what they value is creative freedom to make the games they want to make, opportunities to make awesome games and opportunities to make money selling games. And that’s it. Only a few really want to get into the technology business, or anything that doesn’t involve getting to make games.

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A key quote from a really smart perspective on the difference between video game creator culture and tech creator culture. Lots of tech people presume that game makers, many of them located in the Bay Area and dependent on tech platforms for distribution, are Just Like Them. Nope. As this piece suggests, they’re much closer to Hollywood (or to the indie film community) in mindset.

What Games Are: Valley People And Games People | TechCrunch